Urge Incontinence

Urge Incontinence

With urge incontinence, you may or may not have pelvic-floor muscle weakness or pelvic muscle tension or spasm.

Functional Incontinence

In functional incontinence, the cause isn't related directly to the bladder or pelvic-floor muscles:

  • Joint pain or muscle weakness that cause you to move with difficulty
  • Confusion, dementia, or delirium
  • Environmental barriers, such as the bathroom being too far away, the use of a walker that slows you down, or too many obstacles that you have to walk around to get to the bathroom
  • Psychological problems such as depression or anger

You can also have an "overactive bladder" where your bladder empties frequently throughout the day (more than every 3 or 4 hours during the day) or makes you get up more than once to urinate at night. There is a variety of causes, such as sensitivities to certain foods or beverages.

How Is It Diagnosed?

Your physical therapist will perform an examination to identify the causes of your urinary incontinence. Your therapist also will determine whether you should be referred to a physician for additional tests.

How Can a Physical Therapist Help?

Based on the evaluation results, your physical therapist will individualize treatments to strengthen your pelvic-floor muscles and improve their function. Your physical therapist can help you:

  • Gain control over your symptoms.
  • Reduce the need for pads and special undergarments, incontinence medications, and possibly surgery.

 

Strengthen Your Muscles and Make Them Work Better for You

Your physical therapist will show you how to "find" the right muscles and use them correctly. Using pelvic-floor exercises, the therapist will help you strength those muscles so that you can better control your bladder.

Your physical therapist will:

  • Show you how to "find" the right muscles and use them correctly.
  • Use pelvic-floor exercises to help you strengthen your muscles so that you can better control your bladder. Pelvic-floor exercises include "kegels," in which you gently squeeze the sphincter muscles and squeeze the buttocks, thighs, and stomach muscles.
  • Instruct you in exercises to stretch and strengthen other important muscles, so that they can support proper bladder function.

Depending on your symptoms and level of discomfort, your physical therapist may decide to use biofeedback to make you aware of how your pelvic-floor muscles work and how you can control them better. Electrodes attached vaginally or rectally will provide measurements of muscle activity and display them on a monitor, and the therapist will work with you to help you understand and change those readings. The therapist also may use electrical stimulation to improve your awareness of your muscles and increase muscle strength.

Remember: Knowledge Is Power

Your physical therapist can provide information about:

  • Diet and nutrition to avoid food and drinks that may irritate the bladder.
  • Changing behaviors that make symptoms worse.
  • Ways to decrease urinary urge and frequency.

Further Reading

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) believes that consumers should have access to information that could help them make health care decisions and also prepare them for their visit with their health care provider.

The following articles provide some of the best scientific evidence about treatment of urinary incontinence. The articles report recent research and give an overview of the standards of practice for treatment both in the United States and internationally. The article titles are linked either to a PubMed abstract of the article or to free full text, so that you can read it or print out a copy to bring with you to your health care provider.

Borello-France D, Burgio KL, Goode PS, et al. Adherence to behavioral interventions for urge incontinence when combined with drug therapy adherence rates, barriers, and predictors. Phys Ther. 2010;90:1493–1505. Free Article

Borello-France DF, Downey PA, Zyczynski HM, Rause CR. Continence and quality-of-life outcomes 6 months following an intensive pelvic-floor muscle exercise program for female stress urinary incontinence: a randomized trial comparing low-and high-frequency maintenance exercise. Phys Ther. 2008;88:1545–1553. Free Article

Burgio KL, Goode PS, Urban DA, et al. Preoperative biofeedback assisted behavioral training to decrease post-prostatectomy incontinence: a randomized, controlled trial. J Urol. 2006;175:196–201.Article Summary on PubMed

Quartly E, Hallam T, Kilbreath S, Refshauge K. Strength and endurance of the pelvic floor muscles in continent women: an observational study. Physiotherapy. 2010;96:311–316. Article Summary on PubMed

Post from MoveFowardPT.com, the official consumer Web site of the American Physical Therapy Association, ©2014.

Comments are closed.